The Winter Father:

Collected Short Stories and Novellas, Volume 2

While the title novella of Dubus’s Finding a Girl in America returns to the somewhat off-the-rails literary life of Hank Allison, the collection’s opening story strikes a much darker tone: “Killings”-the basis of the Academy Award-nominated film In the Bedroom-is a swift tale of revenge that leaves readers wondering what they might do in the name of family love.

Dubus’s prowess with narrative compression is on full display in the story “Waiting”: the hollow ache experienced by a woman widowed by the Korean war, took Dubus fourteen months to write and was more than one hundred pages in early manuscript form…buts spans a mere seven pages in published form.

Writing in the New York Times Book Review, Joyce Carol Oates called “The Pretty Girl”-the opening novella of The Times Are Never So Bad“the most compelling and suspenseful work of fiction [Dubus] has written.”

Richard Russo’s introduction to this volume grapples with his complex feelings of reading Dubus’s work over many decades, but when it comes to the much-anthologized masterpiece “A Father’s Story,” Russo writes: “I won’t mince words. It’s one of the finest stories ever penned by an American.”

To learn more about Andre Dubus and this three-volume collection of his work, click here.

If love is time, then Dubus’s work may one day be discovered by a new generation of readers, who will love his writing as honestly and completely as he loved he craft of writing. — Finnegan Schick, The New Criterion

Andre Dubus, one of the 20th century’s most gifted short story writers…like Raymond Carver, became a master of the form… — The New York Times

He is the greater master of meaningful compression, in which a whole novel is packed into a couple of sentences… — Kirkus Reviews 

 

In each surprising tale, Dubus, equally empathic in portraying women and men, tackles with supreme candor precision, artistry, and valor the full emotional and moral weight of love, marriage adultery, friendship, parenthood, ambition, selfishness, and loneliness, subtly critiquing the social mores versus questions of self and faith. — Booklist, Starred Review

“…the three volumes reaffirm Dubus’s status as a master, as an unparalleled excavator of the heart and its pains, its longings, its errors, its thumping against the constant threat of grief, despair, and loneliness.” – Nina MacLaughlin, The Paris Review

“…the language of [Dubus’s] stories is at the service of something outside itself … often we forget we are reading sentences but are put rather into more direct connection with the character’s thoughts and feelings.” – William Pritchard, The Boston Globe

Andre Dubus was born in Lake Charles, Louisiana to a Cajun-Irish Catholic family. He graduated from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and later moved to Massachusetts, where he taught creative writing at Bradford College. His life was marked with personal tragedies, as are those of his protagonists – ostensibly ordinary men who are drawn to addiction and violence as methods to distract themselves from their woes. Unlike his characters, however, Dubus eventually found success and repute, as well as the corresponding offers from large publishers. He nevertheless remained loyal to Godine until the end of his career.

Richard Russo is the author of nine novels, most recently the best-selling Everybody’s Fool and That Old Cape Magic, and the memoir Elsewhere. In 2002 he received the Pulitzer Prize for Empire Falls. He lives in Portland, Maine.