We Don’t Live Here Anymore:

Collected Short Stories and Novellas, Volume 1

In the early 1970s, literary journals that contained Andre Dubus short stories were passed around amongst admiring readers. When his debut collection Separate Flights arrived in 1975, it was immediately celebrated. “Dubus is the sort of writer who instructs the heart, and he ought to be discovered by any number of readers,” wrote The Atlantic Monthly. The collection won the Boston Globe’s Laurence L. & Thomas Winship/PEN New England Award.

The collection includes the novella “We Don’t Live Here Anymore,” which served as the basis for the 2004 film of the same title (nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival); the novella also introduces Dubus’s writer-protagonist Hank Allison, a character who continue to appear throughout his work.

Two years later, the title story of Dubus’s sophomore collection Adultery and Other Choices continued the exploits of Hank Allison. “The title story alone will make it worth your while to go out and get the book,” wrote the New York Times Book Review.

While the collection’s opening stories focus on the fragile nature of youth, later stories shift to darker struggles of adulthood, such as in “Andromache”—Dubus’s first story to appear in The New Yorker (1968)—which traces the aftermath of a tragic death during wartime.

To learn more about Andre Dubus and this three-volume collection of his work, click here.

The short story never rested in more honest hands that when Dubus wrote it. — Finnegan Schick, The New Criterion

Andre Dubus, one of the 20th century’s most gifted short story writers…like Raymond Carver, became a master of the form… — The New York Times

A welcome gathering of work by a writer always worth reading. — Kirkus Reviews 

The solidly yet intricately constructed short stories and novellas of Dubus vibrate with provocative intensity of place, predicament, thought and feeling.  Each is an intimate, unnerving dream of the everyday conflicts between dream and reality, spirit and desire. — Booklist, Starred Review

…the three volumes reaffirm Dubus’s status as a master, as an unparalleled excavator of the heart and its pains, its longings, its errors, its thumping against the constant threat of grief, despair, and loneliness. — Nina MacLaughlin, The Paris Review

…the language of [Dubus’s] stories is at the service of something outside itself … often we forget we are reading sentences but are put rather into more direct connection with the character’s thoughts and feelings. — William Pritchard, The Boston Globe

 

Andre Dubus was born in Lake Charles, Louisiana to a Cajun-Irish Catholic family. He graduated from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and later moved to Massachusetts, where he taught creative writing at Bradford College. His life was marked with personal tragedies, as are those of his protagonists—ostensibly ordinary men who are drawn to addiction and violence as methods to distract themselves from their woes. Unlike his characters, however, Dubus eventually found success and repute, as well as the corresponding offers from large publishers. He nevertheless remained loyal to Godine until the end of his career.

Ann Beattie has been included in four O. Henry Award Collections, in John Updike’s The Best American Short Stories of the Century, and in Jennifer Egan’s The Best American Short Stories 2014. In 2000, she received the PEN/Malamud Award for achievement in the short story. In 2005, she received the Rea Award for the Short Story. She was the Edgar Allan Poe Professor of Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia. She is a member of The American Academy of Arts and Letters and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She and her husband, Lincoln Perry, live in Maine and Key West, Florida.