Virginia Dare:

Stories 1976-1981

Breaking away from his typical first person autobiographical narration, Virginia Dare is the beginning of a new stage in Fielding Dawson’s career; a stage in which he employs “third person [narration], and open endings through transitions. ”  In his introduction Dawson explains that both the random topics of his stories and the unrelated characters make this collection a truer reflection of the human order, because in reality loose ends are not always tied up.

“Completion completes but its original potential in flow with what’s learned and discovered along the way, causing it to change, therefore – so too the narrative will change, leaving, in its wake, reflections of vivid yet often irrelevant-seeming loose ends that refract and sustain initial creation”

Additionally, Virginia Dare is an enthralling addition to any collection of contemporary writing, particularly for those who also enjoy the writing of Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, Dawson’s fellow and better-known “beat generation” writers.

Fielding Dawson was a member of the Beat Generation and of the Black Mountain Poets – two movements that continue to reverberate through modern poetry. Like other Beats, Dawson often worked in a stream-of-consciousness style with minimal punctuation, lax grammar, and naturalistic dialogue. In addition, he was an accomplished painter and collagist whose visual work often appeared alongside his writing in literary magazines.

In later age, Dawson added teaching to his repertoire of talents. He taught writing to prisoners at Sing Sing, to at-risk youth at Upward Bound High School in Hartwick, and to Beatnik hopefuls at the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at the Naropa Institute in Boulder. He continued to write and teach until his death in 2002.