Separate Flights

Andre Dubus was one of the finest short-story writers in this country, and this, his first collection, was published in 1975 to great acclaim. These stories are startlingly realistic evocations of the disruptions that beset daily life: indecision and lying, lovemaking and violent quarrels, evasion and self-discovery. The collection open with a superb novella, We Don’t Live Here Anymore, a chronicle of the cheerless accommodations that keep alive two tired marriages. This is American fiction at its best, by an author whose reputation, talents, and audience continue to grow with every passing year.

Winner of the Boston Globe’s first annual Laurence L. Winship Award as the outstanding book of New England origin in 1975.

“Dubus is good — so good in fact that if [this is] your introduction to his work, you’re apt to wonder where he’s been hiding.”
Washington Post Book World

“I have to believe that the appearance of these stories in book form is an event . . . you will certainly want to keep it and read it again.”
Chicago Tribune Book Review

“Most Underrated Writer — Dubus is the sort of writer who instructs the heart, and he ought to be discovered by any number of readers.”
The Atlantic Monthly

“Dubus has been compared to Chekhov, and there is much that is apt in that. His collection restores faith in the survival of the short story.”
The Los Angeles Times

Andre Dubus was born in Lake Charles, Louisiana to a Cajun-Irish Catholic family. He graduated from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and later moved to Massachusetts, where he taught creative writing at Bradford College. His life was marked with personal tragedies, as are those of his protagonists – ostensibly ordinary men who are drawn to addiction and violence as methods to distract themselves from their woes. Unlike his characters, however, Dubus eventually found success and repute, as well as the corresponding offers from large publishers. He nevertheless remained loyal to Godine until the end of his career.