Seacoast Maine:

Photographs by George Tice

For more than five decades, George Tice has been photographing the landscape of America, and a number of his images have become icons of their time and field. But no other state has held for him the particular affection of Maine – its rockbound coastline, its precarious and isolated islands, its independent and hardworking people. And unmistakably, there is the sense of coming from almost another time and place, and, in the last decade or so, of a landscape transforming itself all too quickly into the conventional palette of the twenty-first century – of its fast-food predictabilities, strip mall excrescences, and the anonymous tangles of the internet highway.

This book makes its focus the Maine we all want to remember and the coastline we perhaps visited at one time and grew to love. Tice, for the past five years, has concentrated on assembling and arranging his favorite photographs. The result is comparable in its scope to Szarkowski’s portrait of Minnesota and in sympathy to Evans’s elegy to Alabama. In all, 107 quadtone photographs, from the fogs off Eastport to the lobster boats off Monhegan, from the grain elevators of Portland to the Shakers of Sabbathday Lake. The emphasis is on the coast, on its ports, its people, its geography, and its architecture. And this seems excusable: for most of us, Maine is its coast. It predominates in our mind’s eye, in the popular imagination, and in the images featured in this book.

Still, the real rationale of a book like this is to validate the vision and the work of an artist, and this ambition is more than justified by page after page of dauntingly beautiful images, carefully arranged and faultlessly printed. If Maine is a state you hold dear, this is a book that says it all.

Praise for Seacoast Maine

Tice’s black and white photos give a haunting look to old, weather-beaten houses and the water and rocky coast look harsh in many photos of the jagged shoreline. The works have such a timeless look, that it is hard to tell the difference between forty-year-old photos and those taken in this decade.
ForeWord Magazine, Dec 2 2009

This is an important book for many reasons. It is important as a record of a passing way of life, of a New England that is fast declining in the wake of tourism and urbanization. And it is important as a document of a time and place.
The Photo Review, Nov 2010

George Tice is best-known for his meticulous black-and-white photography of New Jersey and its surrounds, where he has lived for most of his life. He spent his youth working at various photography-related businesses around New Jersey, including portrait studios and camera shops, photographing all the while. His first book of photographs, Paterson, was published by Rutgers University Press and exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1971. The success of this project led to his establishment as a major figure in the world of art photography, which he remains today. Tice continues to live and work in New Jersey, as do his daughters, who assist him in his studio.

John K. Hanson, Jr. is been the publisher of Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors. He grew up in New Jersey and fell in love with Maine soon after he graduated from Georgetown University. After a failed attempt to start a yacht-building company, he began writing and editing for WoodenBoat magazine. Before long, he managed to start his own boating magazine, which has remained in print for thirty years. He also runs the affiliated website and organizes an annual boating festival.