Krazy Kat & 76 More:

Stories 1950–1976

From “School Days”:

“Don’t be silly. It’s always lonesome at first. You’re away from home and meeting all new people. Just because bright clean boys are in fraternities and sweet lovely girls are in sororities, it doesn’t mean a thing. They’re lonely too. Maybe even more lonely. Clean haircuts, nice clothes and white teeth doesn’t make good men and women, it just makes them more anxious.”
Jody frowned and sneered.
“Aw you’re just jealous.”
Ann sat back and pulled her legs up under her, lit a cigarette and narrowed her eyes.
“Oh?”
Jody bent her head.
“Well, I am,” she whispered.

No writer moves more aptly, quickly, closely, in the tracking of human dimensions of feeling and relation.
Robert Creeley

Fielding Dawson was a member of the Beat Generation and of the Black Mountain Poets – two movements that continue to reverberate through modern poetry. Like other Beats, Dawson often worked in a stream-of-consciousness style with minimal punctuation, lax grammar, and naturalistic dialogue. In addition, he was an accomplished painter and collagist whose visual work often appeared alongside his writing in literary magazines.

In later age, Dawson added teaching to his repertoire of talents. He taught writing to prisoners at Sing Sing, to at-risk youth at Upward Bound High School in Hartwick, and to Beatnik hopefuls at the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at the Naropa Institute in Boulder. He continued to write and teach until his death in 2002.