All Sail Set:

A Romance of the Flying Cloud

Softcover sale price: $9.95 (Regularly $14.95)

An exciting, fact-based, old-fashioned tale of adventure at sea, winner of a Newbery Honor for young readers in 1936.

When his father loses his fortune at sea, a boy, Enoch Thacher, signs up with a famous shipbuilder and takes a record-breaking trip around Cape Horn on the famous Flying Cloud.

The Flying Cloud was a real ship and its maker was master shipbuilder, Donald McKay (1810-1880). The era depicted in this novel is a time when the windships were the queens of the ocean and sail was king. McKay’s company, located in East Boston, launched many of the fastest clipper ships in history, with Flying Cloud being his most famous ship of all.

In All Sail Set, McKay puts Enoch to work during the lofting, building, and rigging of the Flying Cloud, and then to ship out on her for her maiden, record-breaking trip around the Horn. Accompanied by Sperry’s wonderfully vigorous drawings, this realistic nautical yarn from the glory days of sail will appeal to adults as well as young adult readers with a taste for historical adventure.

A magical book. The romance is irresistible.
—Fort Worth Star Telegram

Armstrong Sperry, younger brother to Paul of the Sperry Top-Sider, was a beloved author and illustrator of children’s literature. As a child, he was fascinated by adventure novels such as Robinson Crusoe and Treasure Island, which led him to embark on a year-long tour of the South Pacific that would inspire much of his work. He won the 1941 Newbery Medal for Call It Courage, a novel about a young boy on the island of Hikueru in Polynesia, and wrote or illustrated dozens of other books for young people. After many adventures, he moved with his family to Hanover, New Hampshire, where he lived until his death in 1976.

William McFee was one of the twentieth century’s most beloved authors of sea stories. He spent a large portion of his own life at sea, including its first moments; he was born on his father’s three-masted ship Erin’s Isle. While working as an engineer on ships owned by the United Fruit Company, he wrote dozens of books about seafaring adventures. He also wrote book reviews for The New York Times, including Zelda Fitzgerald’s favorite unfavorable review for her novel Save Me the Waltz.