“Adam Van Doren: Homes of the American Presidents” Exhibit Opens at Childs Gallery

Stop by Childs Gallery on Newbury Street to see the “Adam Van Doren: “Homes of the American Presidents” exhibition, now through Dec. 30th! Through the colorful artwork of Van Doren’s book, The Home Tells the Story: Homes of the American Presidents,” visitors will get a chance to roam through a well-recorded account of past presidents’ residences.

Fine Art Connoisseur highlighted Van Doren’s exhibit in a recent article, giving a sneak peak to some of the pieces on display.

Homes of the American Presidents

Pre-eminent historian David McCullough and noted artist Adam Van Doren unite for an excursion to the celebrated homes of fifteen American presidents, past and present inThe Home Tells the Story: Homes of the American Presidents.” The text is personal and unaffected; Van Doren visited these homes to ensure that he recorded every detail accurately, often becoming acquainted with the former presidents themselves, always trying to portray them in the human environment they created for themselves. The artwork is perceptive and revealing; he misses very little. McCullough puts the history of the homes in perspective in his lucid and perceptive prose. A gift book both useful and beautiful belonging to the library of anyone interested in our architectural, social, or political history.

Andre Dubus’s Reissues Praised in America Magazine

America Magazine released a fantastic review of Andre Dubus’s reissues, praising the craftsmanship and emotion behind the author’s work.

“The works of Andre Dubus are hard to read, even though they are beautifully written—combining the simplicity of Hemingway with the fullness and fluidity of Faulkner—because they face life and love so starkly. Which is why, after almost every story and novella I read, I had to put the book down and wait before starting another. I had to let it settle into my soul before going on. And just that—the act of going on—is what Dubus encourages in us as we read him, to go on no matter how terrible and, in cyclical fashion, how glorious, life gets.”

The piece also mentioned us here at Godine.

“Godine, the only person willing to publish Dubus’s work in book form without the promise of a follow-up novel, was loyal to Dubus and the writer’s own vision of his work. And Dubus was loyal to him.”

Check out the rest of the article here!

Author of “The Winter Father,” “We Don’t Live Here Anymore,” and the newly-released “The Cross Country Runner,” Andre Dubus was born in Lake Charles, Louisiana to a Cajun-Irish Catholic family. He graduated from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and later moved to Massachusetts, where he taught creative writing at Bradford College. His life was marked with personal tragedies, as are those of his protagonists – ostensibly ordinary men who are drawn to addiction and violence as methods to distract themselves from their woes. Unlike his characters, however, Dubus eventually found success and repute, as well as the corresponding offers from large publishers. He nevertheless remained loyal to Godine until the end of his career.

“Trio” Nominated for 2019-2020 Hoosier Book Award

We are so excited to announce that Trio has been nominated for the 2019-2020 Hoosier Book Award by the Indiana Library Federation. We hope that this determined little cat will bring joy to many more children in the years to come.

Written and illustrated by Andrea Wisnewski, “Trio” is one fetching little kitten whose infirmity didn’t stop him from pouncing, sneaking, and jumping like any other feline. Trio especially loves playing with the eleven chickens that share the garage and garden, and he is game to try all their activities: digging up bugs, rolling in the dust, and even laying eggs. The latter requires real effort, especially making it up into the nesting box, but once he figures it out, he returns to it faithfully every day. And his persistence pays off! One day, an egg starts hatching beneath him. Little does he know, the chick that pops out will become his best friend. This is a story about diversity, overcoming obstacles, and ultimately, acceptance. The story is delightful and the brightly colored linocut illustrations endearing, sure to charm adults, children, cats and chickens alike.

Andre Dubus III Interviewed by America Magazine

Andre Dubus III spoke of the life and legacy of his father, writer Andre Dubus, in an interview with America Magazine – The Jesuit Review. Dubus discussed family, religion and forgiveness over the course of the interview conducted by Franklin Freeman. The interview was conducted in response to the volumes of Dubus’s work released by David R. Godine, Publisher such as “The Cross Country Runner.” Dubus III sheds light on the mindset and beliefs of his father.

“None of us are exempt from screwing up. I believe strongly, and I have a hunch my father would agree with me on this, that in his 62 years on the planet, my father put the very best part of himself into his writing. Everything else, including his wife and children, came after that. A close second I would add. But after that.”

“On some level, I think my father knew he wouldn’t have a very long life, and he needed to get to that desk. Well, I’m grateful that he did just that.”

Check out the rest of the interview here: https://www.americamagazine.org/arts-culture/2018/10/26/andre-dubus-iii-his-fathers-life-and-works?fbclid=IwAR0GSmRET9cZu4_oBrGJGlRHhi6fExFGm1vzSvkIjXt7iGim3C2jNcg1wRU

Andre Dubus was born in Lake Charles, Louisiana to a Cajun-Irish Catholic family. He graduated from the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop and later moved to Massachusetts, where he taught creative writing at Bradford College. His life was marked with personal tragedies, as are those of his protagonists – ostensibly ordinary men who are drawn to addiction and violence as methods to distract themselves from their woes. Unlike his characters, however, Dubus eventually found success and repute, as well as the corresponding offers from large publishers. He nevertheless remained loyal to Godine until the end of his career.

Editor Ally Findley Pens Gerald Durrell Article on “Willow and Thatch”

A well-written account of the life and writings of Gerald Durrell from our own editor Ally Findley in Willow and Thatch: Period Dramas! Durrell’s works, such as “Fillets of Plaice,” “Beasts in My Belfry,” and “Fauna and Family,” inspired the PBS period drama titled “The Durrells in Corfu,” which has just started its third season this fall.

“Set in the 1930s and imbued with a sense of childlike wonder, the three books recount the beginnings of a budding naturalist as Gerry explores the Greek island, heading out early each morning and spending hours spellbound by the local fauna —a good portion of which, to his mother’s exasperation, he gleefully brings home with him.”

His Family & His Other Animals

Check out the rest of Ally’s article!

Our Titles in James Mustich’s “1,000 Books to Read Before You Die”

We are very fortunate to have 25 of our books included in James Mustich’s “1,000 Books to Read Before You Die.” This extensive list curated by Mustich contains novels that are embedded in literary history, as well as books that deserve more recognition. So, here are our some of our books that made the list, along with descriptions provided by our website.

1. Study is Hard Work – William H. Armstrong

This is the best guide ever published on how to acquire and maintain good study skills. It covers everything from developing a vocabulary to improving the quality of written work, and has chapters on studying math, science, and languages; taking tests; and using libraries. If anyone you know is college-bound, buy this book: it will prove a lifesaver and a godsend.

2. Aubrey’s Brief Lives – John Aubrey

The whole ferment of the Elizabethan age and the vigor of the century that followed come alive in these “brief portraits” that have been looted by scholars for centuries. Here are Sir Walter Raleigh, Sir Thomas More, Shakespeare, Milton, Marvel, and countless others, who in these pages become not abstract names from a history book, but flesh and blood characters.

3. Les Fleurs du Mal/ The Flowers of Evil – Charles Baudelaire

This translation of Baudelaire’s magnum opus – perhaps the most powerful and influential book of verse from the 19th century – won the American Book Award for Translation.

4. The Thirty Nine Steps – John Buchan

We know the Buchan formula well, although few may remember it was he who set the mold: take an apparently ordinary man, and let him be drawn into a mystery he only vaguely understands; give him a task to perform, and set obstacles in his path; see that he cannot turn to established authority, see that he cannot be certain who he can trust – and then, set the clock ticking. . .

5. The Secret Garden/Little Princess –  Frances Hodgson Burnett

The characters and the story are as fresh today as they were when the book was first published. Graham Rust’s illustrations, with their delicate period flavor and detail, bring to life the whole cast of characters and, of course, the secret garden itself – “the sweetest, most mysterious-looking place anyone could imagine.”

6. The Tartar Steppe – Dino Buzzati

Often likened to Kafka’s The Castle, The Tartar Steppe is both a scathing critique of military life and a meditation on the human thirst for glory. It tells of young Giovanni Drogo, who is posted to a distant fort overlooking the vast Tartar steppe. Although not intending to stay, Giovanni suddenly finds that years have passed, as, almost without his noticing, he has come to share the others’ wait for a foreign invasion that never happens.

7. The Geography of the Imagination – Guy Davenport

There is no way to prepare yourself for reading Guy Davenport. You stand in awe before his knowledge of the archaic and his knowledge of the modern. Even more, you stand in awe of the connections he can make between the archaic and the modern; he makes the remote familiar and the familiar fundamental.
—Los Angeles Times Book Review

8. String too Short to Be Saved – Donald Hall

This is a collection of stories diverse in subject, but sutured together by the limitless affection the author holds for the land and the people of New England. Donald Hall tells about life on a small farm where, as a boy, he spent summers with his grandparents. Gradually the boy grows to be a young man, sees his grandparents aging, the farm become marginal, and finally, the cows sold and the barn abandoned. But these are more than nostalgic memories, for in the measured and tender prose of each episode are signs of the end of things — a childhood, perhaps a culture.

9. Dresser of Sycamore Trees – Garret Keizer

This profoundly contemporary book displays not only Keizer’s knowledge of life’s small practicalities (winding the church clock, shopping for groceries), but also his insights about faith and the mysterious ways of God. With an eye attuned to both the pleasures and foibles that make life on earth so rich, he presents a refreshing and often hilarious account of the hands-on work needed to maintain a parish and sustain its spirit. He is a man who believes that God’s intentions, if seldom apparent, are inevitably compassionate and compelling.

10. Life a User’s Manual – Georges Perec

Life is an unclassified masterpiece, a sprawling compendium as encyclopedic as Dante’s Commedia and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and, in its break with tradition, as inspiring as Joyce’s Ulysses. Structured around a single moment in time — 8:00 p.m. on June 23, 1975 — Perec’s spellbinding puzzle begins in an apartment block in the XVIIth arrondissement of Paris where, chapter by chapter, room by room, like an onion being peeled, an extraordinary rich cast of characters is revealed in a series of tales that are bizarre, unlikely, moving, funny, or (sometimes) quite ordinary.

11. Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome

For anyone who loves sailing and adventure, Arthur Ransome’s classicSwallows and Amazons series stands alone. Originally published in the UK over a half century ago, these books are still eagerly read by children, despite their length and their decidedly British protagonists. We attribute their success to two facts: first, Ransome is a great storyteller and, second, he clearly writes from first-hand experience. Independence and initiative are qualities any child can understand and every volume in this collection celebrates these virtues.

12. Lark Rise to Candleford – Flora Thompson

Flora Thompson (1876–1947) wrote what may be the quintessential distillation of English country life at the turn of the twentieth century. In 1945, the three books Lark Rise (1939), Over to Candleford (1941), and Candleford Green(1943) were published together in one elegant volume, and this new omnibus Nonpareil edition, complete with charming wood engravings, should be a cause for real rejoicing.

Other titles included on the list are:

Clementine in the Kitchen by Samuel and Narcisse Chamberlain

The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody by Will Cuppy

A Johnson Reader by Samuel Johnson

Cider with Rosie by Laurie Lee

Ring of Bright Water by Gavin Maxwell

Age Like This by George Orwell

In Front of Your Nose by George Orwell

As I Please by George Orwell

My Country Right or Left by George Orwell

Giving Up the Gun by Noel Perrin

The House of Life by Mario Praz

The Prelude by William Wordsworth

With that, happy reading from us here at Godine!

Andre Dubus’s “The Cross Country Runner” Out Now!

Andre Dubus’s The Cross Country Runner has hit the shelves TODAY! We are forever honored to carry on the legacy of the prolific Dubus. Buy the book on our site.

The Cross Country Runner brings together Andre Dubus’s fifth collection of short stories and novellas, The Last Worthless Evening, and Voices from the Moonhis longest, most masterful novella—with previously uncollected stories, and a new introduction by PEN Faulkner Award-winning author Tobias Wolff.

“It’s divorce that did it,” his father had said last night. So begins Voices from the Moon, the 126-page novella that shows Dubus at the height of his empathetic powers: the story alternates between the viewpoints of Richie Stowe, a serious twelve-year-old who plans to become a priest, and the five other members of his family; it takes place over the course of a single day.

The four novellas and two stories of The Last Worthless Evening range further than in any previous Dubus collection: racial tension in the Navy; a detective story homage; a Hispanic shortstop; the unlikely pairing of an eleven-year-old kid and a dangerous Vietnam vet.

Finally, this third volume in the series draws together for the first time many of Dubus’s previously uncollected stories, including work from the mid-1960s and the late 1990s.

The earliest story appearing here in book form for the first time— “The Cross Country Runner”—was first published in the long-defunct Midwestern University Quarterly in 1966 when Dubus was 30 years old and only recently graduated from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

The final story—the western-themed “Sisters”—is the last piece of fiction Dubus was working on when he died suddenly in 1999 at just 63 years old.

To learn more about Andre Dubus and this three-volume collection of his work, click here.

 

“Dubus’ frank and inquisitive stories of conscience are incisively of their time and ours.” — Booklist Starred Review

A welcome gathering in a worthy project to bring Dubus’ work to a new generation of readers. — Kirkus Reviews

[The] three volumes reaffirm Dubus’s status as master…[as] unparalleled excavator of the heart and its pains, its longings, its errors, its thumping against the constant threat of grief, despair, and loneliness. — Nina MacLaughlin, The Paris Review

…the language of [Dubus’s] stories is at the service of something outside itself … often we forget we are reading sentences but are put rather into more direct connection with the character’s thoughts and feelings. — William Pritchard, The Boston Globe

How rare it is these days to encounter characters with wills, with a sense of choice. — John Updike on Voices from the Moon, New Yorker

“Rose,” by itself, is worth the price of the book; it is the most powerful entry in Dubus’s impressive canon. —Time on The Last Worthless Evening

Remembering the Rev. F Washington Jarvis

Many outlets have come together to celebrate the life and teachings of The Rev. F Washington Jarvis III, author of “With Love and Prayers: a Headmaster Speaks to the New Generation,” who passed on October 7th.

The relationship that Godine shared with the former headmaster is one we will cherish forever. We were so privileged to have Rev. Jarvis as one of our authors, and our prayers go out to his family and friends at this time.

“The Rev. Jarvis “created the Roxbury Latin we have today,’ said Dennis Kanin, a former president of school’s Board of Trustees and a principal at the New Boston Ventures residential real estate development firm. ‘Under him, the guiding philosophy became ‘every boy is known and loved,’ and he meant that.'”— The Boston Globe

“Even with the breadth and depth of professional expertise that Tony could share with his ELM students, he was at heart a leader with a clear, straightforward message. “Father Jarvis taught me that the most important quality of a good schoolmaster is to know and love my students,” recalls Win Bassett ‘15, an English teacher at Montgomery Bell Academy in Nashville.” —Berkeley Divinity School

Reverend F. Washington Jarvis, a native of Cleveland, Ohio, came to Boston to complete his undergraduate degree at Harvard. After earning a master’s degree at the University of Cambridge, he returned to Boston to teach at the Roxbury Latin School, the oldest school in America. He later became headmaster of the school, a position he held for over thirty years.

After retiring as headmaster in 2004, Jarvis served as a chaplain at Eton College and as a scholar-in-residence at schools in Australia. In addition, he served terms as president of both the Headmasters’ Association of the U.S. and the Country Day School Headmasters’ Association. He taught at Yale, where he was the Director of the Educational Leadership and Ministry Program at the Berkeley Divinity School.

“The Practicing Stoic” and “The Dog Who Wouldn’t Be” Available as Ebooks

We are excited to announce that both “The Practicing Stoic,” by Ward Farnsworth, and “The Dog Who Wouldn’t Be,” by Farley Mowat, are now officially live on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and other retailers as ebooks!

“Throughout The Practicing Stoic, Farnsworth beautifully integrates his own observations with scores of quotations from Epictetus, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, Montaigne and others. As a result, this isn’t just a book to read—it’s a book to return to, a book that will provide perspective and consolation at times of heartbreak or calamity. — Michael Dirda, The Washington Post

“The Dog Who Wouldn’t Be was, and will forever remain, one of my first and deepest literary loves. . . . This classic remains one of the best biographies of an animal ever written–a masterful tribute to the bond between an extraordinary boy and an extraordinary dog.”
Sy Montgomery, author of Tamed and Untamed: Close Encounters of the Animal Kind

Happy e-reading!

“The Practicing Stoic” and Stoic Week Celebrations

Stoic Week has come to an end, but that does not stop us from celebrating the wisdom and insight we have gained from Ward Farnsworth’s “The Practicing Stoic: A Philosophical User’s Manual.”

Here are some of our favorite quotes from the novel:

“Our reactions to all things are of our own making, even if they don’t seem that way, and that we underrate our power to rid ourselves of the ones who treat us poorly.”

“Material things are indifferent; how we use them is not.”

“By seeing how small our affairs look in the larger scheme of things, the Stoic means to induce a felt sense of humility and attraction to virtue.”

“As befits a good Stoic, Farnsworth’s expository prose exhibits both clarity and an unflappable calm… Throughout The Practicing Stoic, Farnsworth beautifully integrates his own observations with scores of quotations from Epictetus, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, Montaigne and others. As a result, this isn’t just a book to read—it’s a book to return to, a book that will provide perspective and consolation at times of heartbreak or calamity.” — Michael Dirda, The Washington Post

Tobias Wolff’s “The Cross Country Runner” Introduction Featured on The American Scholar

Check out Tobias Wolff’s introduction to Andre Dubus’s “The Cross Country Runner” in The American Scholar‘s latest article!

“How grateful I am for those days. that friendship, the stories Andre told, the stories he wrote. Well, here they are, some of the very best, a feast. Dig in.” – Tobias Wolff

Andre Dubus was the award-winning author of seven collections of stories and novellas, one novel, and two collections of essays. After the publication of his debut story collection in 1975 (“Separate Flights,” David R. Godine, Publisher), Dubus devoted his writing life to the story form. Considered one of the greatest American short story writers of the twentieth century, his work is notable for its spare prose and illuminative insights into the human heart. Dubus is often compared to Anton Chekhov.

[The] three volumes reaffirm Dubus’s status as master…[as] unparalleled excavator of the heart and its pains, its longings, its errors, its thumping against the constant threat of grief, despair, and loneliness. — Nina MacLaughlin, The Paris Review

“The Cross Country Runner,” the third volume in Dubus’s short story collection, comes out on October 18th!

Peter Ackerman Reading on October 13th

We are excited to announce that Peter Ackerman will be at Vroman’s Bookstore in Pasadena, CA for a story-time reading on October 13th at 10:30am!

Ackerman has written three children’s books published by Godine: The Lonely Phone Booth, The Lonely Typewriter, and The Screaming Chef. In addition, he co-wrote two movies from the Ice Age series and the second Angry Birds movie, which is coming out next year.

Peter’s books are witty, beautifully illustrated, and a true joy to read. He is thoroughly excited to have the chance to share his work himself with younger readers

For more information about Ackerman check out his author page, and for info about the venue head to Vroman’s website!